Céad Míle Fáilte!... (One hundred thousand welcomes!)

"Enchanting Ireland"... Take an artistic journey to the Emerald Isle as seen through the eyes and palette of American Artist, Bernie Rosage Jr. A collection of paintings and adventures inspired by two trips Bernie and his wife, Tami, took to the Emerald Isle. The first trip was in 2008 and the second was in 2014.

Bernie has been blogging their adventures and the background of this collection on this blog... browse around and enjoy yourself.

Paintings are available for purchase... Click HERE to see the collection, availability, and prices.

Wednesday, September 23, 2009

To Arthur... Slainte!

To Arthur...

To Guinness...


Happy Arthur's Day...



Celebrating 250 years of the Black Stuff

1759 ~ 2009





May the most you wish for...
Be the least you get.

Now go and "Wet Your Whistle"... Slainte!

Tuesday, September 1, 2009

Enchanting Ireland Art Exhibit @ New Bern ArtWorks by Bernie Rosage Jr: FOR IMMEDIATE NEWS RELEASE


“Enchanting Ireland”


September 1 - 30, 2009

New Bern ArtWorks & Company Gallery and Studio
323B Middle Street (rear)
New Bern, North Carolina 28560
252 634-9002
Art Walk and Artist's Reception Friday, September 11th, 5-8PM.



Take an artistic journey to the Emerald Isle as seen through the eyes and palette of American Artist, Bernie Rosage Jr. Selected works from the "Enchanting Ireland" collection is on exhibit at ArtWorks and Company, New Bern, NC. This collection was inspired by a trip Bernie and his wife, Tami, took to Ireland in celebration of their 20th wedding anniversary and their family heritage. These works are the culmination of 11 months of arduous work… “I thoroughly enjoyed painting this series… with each stroke it felt as if I was still in that special place” states Rosage. He goes on to say, “It is my wish that you (the viewer) get a sense of the beauty and magical quality of the Irish landscape, culture, and her people as you view these works… in short… I hope you too are Enchanted.”


Bernie Rosage Jr. is a native of Onslow County, North Carolina, where he resides with his wife, Tami, their children and grandchildren. Bernie’s passion for art started at an early age and continues as a self taught artist. He likes the term "self motivated to be taught" as he works hard to fuel his passion of oil painting. His painterly approach to color and texture adds to his unique sense of style, best defined as Impressionistic Realism. His subjects are often personal and convey feelings of peace, serenity, and nostalgia. "I am drawn to country roads, marshlands, cottages, barns, trees, open fields, flowing rivers, etc... anything that eludes to a peaceful, calming feeling when viewed," states Rosage. His paintings are a wonderful culmination of sensitivity and skill and are collected throughout the United States, Ireland, Australia, and the United Kingdom.
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http://www.bernierosage.com/
Go to Bernie’s web page and click on his “Enchanting Ireland” blog to read more about these paintings and their experiences in Ireland.

"Enchanting Ireland" Exhibit continues in New Bern, NC


My "Enchanting Ireland" Exhibit tour continues with stop #2 in New Bern. NC...

Bernie Rosage Jr, and Jonathan Grauel, Featured Artists for September at New Bern ArtWorks and Company Gallery located in the heart of New Bern, North Carolina.

Selected works from Bernie's "Enchanting Ireland" collection will be on exhibit at ArtWorks and Company Gallery and Studio throughout the month of September.

Meet Bernie at the Gallery artist's reception on Friday, September 11th from 5-8pm. Take a walking tour of all the galleries in historic downtown New Bern at that time since the reception is in conjunction with the New Bern Artwalk Evening.


My family lends a hand to help move the Enchanting Ireland collection from the Council for the Arts, Jacksonville, NC to ArtWorks and Company Gallery in New Bern, NC last Saturday. Picture LtoR: My daughter, Olivia, my wife, Tami, my mom, Maggie, and my dad, Bernie Sr.


Artist and gallery partner, George Hunter, helps on the New Bern side of the move.
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The exhibit will be on display at New Bern ArtWorks and Company Gallery the entire month of September... hope you make plans to attend.
Bernie

Saturday, August 15, 2009

My Irish Blessing for you....

video

Thursday, August 6, 2009

"Enchanting Ireland" Exhibit Opening BIG Success!



A special thank you to everyone who attended... especially those who found new homes for several of my paintings. The exhibit runs at the Council for the Arts through August 28th. Be sure to drop by and see it... it's the only time the entire collection will be on exhibit.


Check out this short youtube video about the opening... Enchanting Ireland Exhibit Opening a HUGE Success!


Thanks again...
Bernie

PS... hope you enjoy these photos from the opening reception.

Thanks again... Bernie and Tami




































Thursday, July 30, 2009

A bit of enchantment...

An article about my upcoming exhibit was featured in the Sunday edition of the Jacksonville Daily News. The article was written by Deirdre Freeman who interviewed me over the phone while we were on vacation last week. As I hung up the phone I told Tami that I didn't know what to expect... she knows how I can ramble on the phone. We got back Sunday in time to get the paper... Deirdre did a superb job... she managed to write a love story sprinkled with a little family history and artwork... Thanks Deirdre!

Click on the link below to read her article...

A bit of enchantment...
After a trip to Ireland, a local artist was inspired to hold his first solo exhibit
July 26, 2009 8:29 PM
Deirdre Freeman

Sunday, July 26, 2009

"Enchanting Ireland" Exhibit: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

“Enchanting Ireland”

August 2 - 28, 2009

Baysden Gallery, Council for the Arts
826 New Bridge Street, Jacksonville, NC 28540


Take an artistic journey to the Emerald Isle as seen through the eyes and palette of American Artist, Bernie Rosage Jr. The entire "Enchanting Ireland" collection (39 oil paintings) is on exhibit here for the first time. This collection was inspired by a trip Bernie and his wife, Tami, took to Ireland in celebration of their 20th wedding anniversary and their family heritage. These 39 works are the culmination of 11 months of arduous work… “I thoroughly enjoyed painting this series… with each stroke it felt as if I was still in that special place” states Rosage. He goes on to say, “It is my wish that you (the viewer) get a sense of the beauty and magical quality of the Irish landscape, culture, and her people as you view these works… in short… I hope you too are Enchanted.”

Bernie Rosage Jr. is a native of Onslow County, North Carolina, where he resides with his wife, Tami, their children and grandchildren. Bernie’s passion for art started at an early age and continues as a self taught artist. He likes the term "self motivated to be taught" as he works hard to fuel his passion of oil painting. His painterly approach to color and texture adds to his unique sense of style, best defined as Impressionistic Realism. His subjects are often personal and convey feelings of peace, serenity, and nostalgia. "I am drawn to country roads, marshlands, cottages, barns, trees, open fields, flowing rivers, etc... anything that eludes to a peaceful, calming feeling when viewed," states Rosage. His paintings are a wonderful culmination of sensitivity and skill and are collected throughout the United States, Ireland, Australia, and the United Kingdom.
.
http://www.bernierosage.com/
Go to Bernie’s web page and click on his “Enchanting Ireland” blog to read more about these paintings and their experiences in Ireland.

Monday, July 13, 2009

Céad Míle Fáilte!... (One hundred thousand welcomes!)

"Enchanting Ireland"... Take an artistic journey to the Emerald Isle as seen through the eyes and palette of American Artist, Bernie Rosage Jr. A collection of 40 paintings inspired by a recent trip Bernie and his wife, Tami, took to Ireland in celebration of their 20th wedding anniversary and their family heritage.

The collection is on exhibit at the Baysden Gallery in Jacksonville, NC August 2 - 28, 2009.

Paintings are available for purchase... Click HERE to see the collection, availability, and prices.

Bernie has been blogging their adventures and the background of this collection on this blog... stay awhile and enjoy yourself.

Movie trailer for exhibit...


Video link:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h2gDeWcZOSo

Sunday, July 12, 2009

Several paintings from the series that I plan to blog about soon...

Click on images for larger view...


"Wet your Whistle"... 10x8” oil
Another tribute to two Irish staples… Music and Guinness. Guinness is the bevy of choice in Ireland. All you have to say is, “I’ll have a pint”, and a Guinness is brought to you in about two minutes… it takes that long to be poured correctly according to the best barkeeps. Guinness is celebrating their 250th anniversary this year. Founded in 1759 by Arthur Guinness in Dublin at St James Gate, it has been the bevy of choice not only in Ireland but many other countries ever since. The name Guinness means more than beer … Every generation since Arthur has played a major role in contributions to the country through philanthropy and service. In fact, the Guinness name, in Ireland, is revered like George Washington, Robert E. Lee, and Martin Luther King Jr. are in the U.S. The Guinness Storehouse since it began has been known to that take care of its employees. Even in the 1700’s they offered pensions and housing to their workers… and in the event of death… they continued the pensions to the wives. The old saying to every daughter was “Marry a Guinness man, he’s worth a bundle dead or alive.”



"Ladies View"... Ring of Kerry, Killarney, County Kerry, 14x18" oil
Ladies View is a scenic point along of the Ring of Kerry, in Killarney National Park, Ireland. The name comes from admiration of the view given by Queen Victoria's ladies-in-waiting during their 1861 visit. Ladies View is the most famous and photographed view of Killarney and is approximately 11 miles from the town of Killarney, one of our favorite stays during our visit.



"St. Patrick's Cathedral... Interior View"... Dublin, 24x12" oil
Built in honor of Ireland’s patron saint, Saint Patrick’s Cathedral stands adjacent to the famous well where tradition has it Saint Patrick baptized converts on his visit to Dublin. Saint Patrick's Cathedral in Dublin, also known as The National Cathedral and Collegiate Church of Saint Patrick, Dublin founded in 1191, is the largest church in Ireland. The present building dates from 1220. This interior view is from the altar looking toward the entrance.

Side note: Saint Patrick (c. 390 – 460) was a Christian missionary, who first brought the Gospel and Christianity to Ireland and is recognized as the patron saint of Ireland.



"O'Carroll's Cove"... Ring of Kerry, 11x14" oil
The Ring of Kerry is part of the mystical & unspoiled region of Ireland that has attracted visitors for hundreds of years. The Ring is in the top ten most scenic drives on the Planet… a 112 mile drive along the Iveragh Peninsula in the south western region offers some of the most spectacular scenery and beauty beyond question. Jagged cliffs work their way down to the North Atlantic Ocean. One of the crowning jewels of the Ring is O’Carroll’s Cove. The strand here is one of Ireland’s many pristine beaches.



"Poulnabrone Dolmen"... The Burren, County Clare, 24x30" oil
The Burren, a great rocky expanse in County Clare, is one of the world's truly unique places in that it can supports Arctic, Mediterranean and Alpine plants side-by-side. Its ancient, awe inspiring stone structures hold secrets from the past that may never be unraveled. Poulnabrone Portal Dolmen is an ancient stone tomb dating between 2000 - 2500 B.C. It's just one of the many ancient historic monuments dotted throughout Ireland.



"The Fairy Tree", 24x24" oil
Ireland is steeped in superstition and folklore that is handed down from generation to generation. Some stories have been in written form since the 8th Century but most originated over 2000 years ago when druids passed on stories orally from one generation to the next. Like the Gaelic language itself many of Irelands legends have links with those of ancient Celtic races throughout Europe. Irish folklore is rich in tales of fairies, leprechauns, banshees, and other supernatural beings. One such folklore is that of the Fairy Tree. When a lone Hawthorne , Ash, or Oak tree is growing in a field it is best to let it be… it is considered a Fairy Tree. The Fairy Tree is supposed to be a magical gateway into the little folk's world. Some believe the fairies live in the tree; others believe the tree is a door or gateway for the fairies to pass from their realm into our world and then back again at their whim. It is a superstition that if one interfered with such a tree then bad luck would follow because this was the home of the ‘little people’. Some superstitions have deep roots… recently a road was being upgraded to a major highway and one such tree was in the way – so instead of chopping it out – they built the road around it. This is true… Tami and I traveled on the highway that conveniently curved around a lone Hawthorne tree or should I say, “Fairy Tree”.

Side note: Be sure to look closely at this painting… you never know what you might find.



"Solitude near the Long Walk"... Galway, 18x24" oil
The Long Walk is a street lined with colorful houses located on the banks of the River Corrib where it meets the Galway Bay. Along this street Galway's gentry of old used to go for strolls. People today still stroll the promenade at The Long Walk which is mentioned in Steve Earle’s recent hit song “Galway Girl”… from the movie PS, I Love You.
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Well, I took a stroll on the old long walk
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Of a day -I-ay-I-ay
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"Fields of Tipperary"... County Tipperary, 11x14" oil
When we think of Ireland, we think of the Emerald Isle, the shamrock, the "Wearing of the Green" and the 37 other almost proverbial shades of green. The landscape of Ireland is unsurpassed in beauty. The Emerald Isle boasts the fact that one can see “40 shades of green” an expression made famous by our own Johnny Cash. After a trip to Ireland in the early it seems “The man in black” was also enchanted… so much that he recorded an album in 1961. The most enduring of Cash's Irish songs is "Forty Shades of Green", including the confession that "most of all I miss a girl in Tipperary town, and most of all I miss her lips as soft as eiderdown".



"Annie Moore... Farewell Dear Ol' Erin", 12x24" oil
Immigration has played a major role in Irish history… past and present. The potato famine in the mid 1800’s brought millions to the United States to elude starvation… many have been immigrating ever since to live the “American Dream” . Only within the last several years has Ireland’s economy thrived. I asked a local woman in Killarney, “Why do you treat Americans so good here?”… her response… “Because you opened your borders to us when no one else would … we would have perished.” Made me proud to be an American. Annie Moore (January 1, 1877 - 1923) was the first immigrant to the United States to pass through the Ellis Island facility in New York Harbor. She arrived from County Cork, Ireland aboard the steamship Nevada on January 1, 1892, her fifteenth birthday, She was accompanied by her two brothers to meet their parents who had come to the United States in 1888. As the first person to be processed at the newly opened facility, she was presented with an American $10 gold piece. Annie Moore is honored by bronze statues at the Ellis Island Immigration Museum and in Cobh (pronounced Cove), the Irish seaport from which she sailed. My model of Annie for this painting was the statue of her in the port town of Cobh, where the majority of the Irish immigrants left their home for a new life in Amerikay.
Statue of Annie Moore and her two brothers in Cobh, County Cork, Ireland... my model for Annie in this painting.
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"Pat Murphy of the Irish Brigade"... 8x16" oil
This painting is my representation and acknowledgment of the Irish in America. While in Ireland I noticed the local folks look just like us… then it dawned on me… they are us. I did some research… there are over 34.5 million U.S. residents who claim Irish ancestry. This number is almost nine times the population of Ireland itself (4.1 million). Their contributions are too great to list… they are a part of our history just as we are a part of theirs.

At the outbreak of the American Civil War an estimated 170,000 men born in Ireland joined the Union Army, whereas only 40,000 were in the Confederate Army. At the Battle of Fredericksburg they were directly opposed to each other and cheered each others bravery. The title for this painting comes from a song of that period with the same title…
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With a pipe in his mouth sat a handsome young blade,
And a song he was singing so gaily,
His name was Pat Murphy of the Irish Brigade
And he sang of the land of Shillelagh.
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The day after battle, the dead lay in heaps
Pat Murphy lay bleeding and gory,
With a hole in his breast from some enemy's ball
Had ended his passion for glory,
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No more in the camps will his letters be read
Nor his voice be heard singing so gaily
For he died far away from the friends that he loved
And far from the land of shillelagh.

Friday, July 10, 2009

"Irish Stew and a Pint"


"Irish Stew and a Pint"... 14x11" Oil on gallery wrapped canvas by Bernie Rosage Jr., 2009.

Tami and I had our first Pub Grub and pint in Ireland's oldest pub...The Brazen Head... in Dublin. In my American mindset I think of anything over 100 years to be old... well that bubble was burst as we enjoyed ourselves in the Brazen Head which has been a pub since 1198AD. WOW... now that's OLD!

The pub is a short walk from Christ Church Cathedral and The Guinness Brewery and is well worth a visit for both its historic value and reputation as one of Dublin's best Irish music venues.

While it is unclear how much of the original 11th century coach house is still intact, there is a palpable sense of history within these timeworn walls. If you are looking for the true Irish pub experience then the Brazen Head Pub should be your first port of call as it was ours.
It was one of James Joyce's favs and was featured in his famous book 'Ulysses'.

The Brazen Head has managed to retain the charm and characteristics of it's past and in particular it's patrons, who have included such literaries as James Joyce, Brendan Behan and Jonathan Swift as well as such revolutionaries as Robert Emmet, Wolfe Tone, Daniel O'Connell and Michael Collins.
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Today the patrons still include some famous faces, including some very famous musicians like Van Morrison, Hothouse Flowers, Mary Black and Garth Brooks...
not to mention... two jovial Americans... US... Sláinte!
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Check out this video ad for the Brazen Head...

Thursday, July 2, 2009

"Waiting for the Hen Party"


"Waiting for the Hen Party"... 30x20" Oil on gallery wrapped canvas by Bernie Rosage Jr., 2009.
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This scene is set beneath the Irish flag at the Eamonn Doran's Pub in Dublin, Ireland. I saw this young woman outside in the rain and immediately thought of the title for this painting... "Waiting for the Hen Party". The Irish Hen Party (equivalent to our Bachelorette parties) seemed to be the order of the day... or night I should say. Tami and I witnessed several groups of young ladies dressed in "Hen Party Garb" partying throughout the pubs of Dublin. What amazed me most was how those young women managed to walk on the cobbled stone streets in high heels... especially after a pint or two or three!

Thursday, June 25, 2009

"Off to Kiss the Blarney Stone"... Our Quest for the Gift of Gab!


"Off to Kiss the Blarney Stone"... 24x18" oil on gallery wrapped canvas by Bernie Rosage Jr., 2009. County Cork, Ireland.

Blarney Castle in County Cork was one of our favorite parts of our trip to Ireland. The "Kissing of the Blarney Stone" was just a small part... the castle and grounds were breathe taking... a beautiful spot and experience!


For many of the visitors to Blarney, their first priority is to kiss the famous Blarney Stone high up on the Blarney Castle battlements. Tradition holds that those who kiss the Blarney Stone will be endowed with the gift of eloquence - "the gift of the gab", as the locals call it.

Over 400,000 people travel to Blarney every year to kiss the Stone of Eloquence.


Our (Bernie and Tami's) quest... to climb Blarney Castle, kiss the Blarney Stone, and gain the gift of gab!

Blarney Castle was built nearly six hundred years ago by one of Ireland’s greatest chieftains, Cormac MacCarthy, and has been attracting attention beyond Munster ever since. Over the last few hundred years, millions have flocked to Blarney, making it a world landmark and one of Ireland’s greatest treasures.




The quest and climb begins...


To be honest... Tami was hoping the kiss would have the reverse effect on me and that I would "talk less" from this point on... the climb continues...

We reach the top only to find we are not the only ones on "the quest! "


The view from the top is grand...

There’s not just the Stone to make the climb to the battlements worthwhile. In 1837, Samuel Lewis wrote that the top of the Castle “commands a very fine view over a rich undulating tract... on the east is the Comane bog, many years since an impenetrable wilderness, and the last receptacle for wolves in this part of the country: that river, which takes its name from its serpentine course, flows through the bog and joins the river Blarney under the walls of the castle...”




Tami kissing the Blarney Stone...

now it's Bernie's turn. Be sure to watch the video within this post to get a better idea how the kiss is done.


It's official... our quest completed... we even have the tickets to prove it!

Some other famous people kissed the Blarney Stone too... Mick Jagger, Winston Churchill, Laurel & Hardy... to name a few.

After typing that last line a mental image of Mick's lips and mine... GROSS!


Thank goodness that mental image is cleared after seeing this shot... I'll kiss Tami anytime over a Blarney Stone or a Rolling Stone... she's the real solid rock in my life!

Check out the video...

Kissing the Blarney Stone, Blarney Castle, Ireland



Facts About the Blarney Stone
- The location of the Blarney Stone is in the village of Blarney about 5 miles (8 km) northwest of Cork, Ireland.

- The Blarney Stone is a block of bluestone built into the battlements of Blarney Castle.
- The Blarney castle and stone are one of the most popular tourist sites in Ireland, attracting millions of visitors from around the world who wish to tour the castle and kiss the stone.
According to legend, kissing the stone endows the kisser with the gift of gab, eloquence or skill at flattery.

- The word blarney has come to mean clever, flattering, or coaxing talk.

- The name of the village Blarney is derived from the Irish word An blarna meaning 'the plain'.

History of the Blarney Stone
The most commonly accepted story of the stone is that, in gratitude for Irish support at the battle of Bannockburn in 1314 (a Scottish defeat of the English), Robert the Bruce gave a portion of the stone to Cormac McCarthy, King of Munster. Installed at Cormac McCarthy’s stronghold, Blarney Castle, it became known as the Blarney Stone. A century later, in 1446, King Dermot McCarthy then installed the stone in an enlarged castle he constructed.

During the time of Queen Elizabeth I, Dermot McCarthy, the ruler of the castle, was required to surrender his fortress to the Queen as proof of his loyalty. He said he would be delighted to do so, but something always happened at the last moment to prevent his surrender. His excuses became so frequent that the official who had been demanding the castle in the name of the Queen became a joke at the Court. Once, when the eloquent excuses of McCarthy were repeated to the Queen, she said "Odds bodikins, more Blarney talk!" The term Blarney has thus come to mean 'the ability to influence and coax with fair words and soft speech without giving offense'.

Kissing the Blarney Stone
Kissing the stone is for some people a difficult physical feat. In past times, to kiss the Stone people were hung by their heels over the edge of the parapet. One day a pilgrim broke from the grasp of his friends and went hurtling downward to certain death. Since that time the stone has been kissed by another method. First, you sit with your back towards the stone and then someone sits upon your legs or firmly holds your feet. Next, leaning far back and downward into the abyss while grasping the iron rails, you lower yourself until your head is even with the stone to be kissed.

Blarney Stone Legends
Just how long the custom of kissing the Blarney Stone has been practiced or how it originated is not known. One local legend claims that an old women, saved from drowning by a king of Munster, rewarded him with a spell, that if he would kiss a stone on the castle's top, he would gain a speech that would win all to him.

Concerning the power of the stone, Francis Sylvester, an Irish bard of the early nineteenth century, wrote:
There is a stone there, that whoever kisses,Oh! He never misses to grow eloquent:'Tis he may clamber to a lady's chamber,Or become a member of Parliament.

Other Legends about the Blarney Stone
- It was the rock that Moses struck with his staff to produce water for the Israelites during their exodus from Egypt.
- It was the stone that Jacob used as a pillow, and was brought to Ireland by the prophet Jeremiah.
- It was the Stone of Ezel, which David hid behind on Jonathan's advice, while fleeing from King Saul, and may have been brought back to Ireland during the Crusades.
- It was the rock pillow used by St. Columba of Iona on his deathbed.
Sources:
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Myth Busters...
The following question and answer comes from yahoo! answers...
Question:
Should I kiss the Blarney Stone?
I heard that it would be stupid to kiss the Blarney Stone because drunken Irishmen like to pee on it so that when tourists like myself kiss it, they can get a laugh out of it. Is this true?
Best Answer:
Hi. I'm from Cork which is a few miles from Blarney. The Blarney Stone is at the very top of a castle in the village of Blarney. Please believe me when I tell you that NOBODY is allowed to p!ss on the Blarney Stone! It's surrounded by keepers of the castle at all times and I'm fairly sure that its locked securely at night. This is a world famous tourist spot. They take good care of it. Trust me. Don't forget to visit The Blarney Wooden Mills which is across the road from the castle. Another popular tourist spot. And try to see Cork City while you're at it.The only p!ssing you will probably see will be from the sky. It may be raining when you get there. Ireland is not the sunniest of countries! Enjoy your stay.
Cead Mile Failte (Irish for 100,000 welcomes)
Have a good one!